artificial intelligence

A pile of EU strategy documents leading to alternative paths towards responsible AI

Expectations shape future ecosystems for responsible AI

For years, the American hiring company HireVue had used a controversial AI application to analyze candidates’ facial features and movements during job interviews. In January 2021, the company had undergone an independent audit that proved its algorithms to be unbiased, or so they claimed. The case received public attention when critics argued that the hiring company had misrepresented the audit results.

Were the job candidates assessed fairly by the algorithms? Who should have ensured that the auditing itself was unbiased? The algorithmic auditing industry is emerging and questions like these reveal its complex nature.

Banner image: data file with personal information

Yes, privacy is worth the effort. Here’s why

When we advocate for privacy, we tend to concentrate on the negative consequences of privacy violations [56; 32; 19; 50]. These portrayals are extremely important, but they paint only one half of the picture. Privacy also brings about net-positive advantages for individuals and organizations. These advantages can act as powerful internal incentives, driving privacy adoption. A key addition to external incentives like regulation and public pressure.

A regulatory compliance stamp with blue lights in the background

EU published an AI regulation proposal. Should we worry?

In late April, the European Commission laid out its vision of how AI technologies should be governed. The proposal meshes AI regulation with product safety rules, controls how AI systems should be developed and technically composed, introduces market supervision arrangements and gives the authorities wide-ranging powers to impose potentially crippling sanctions.

At first glance, the proposal seems quite a mouthful. It is complex, appears relatively heavy-handed and imposes a host of stringent requirements on developers. But is there really a reason to be worried?